Pet-Friendly Boutique Hotels in
Paris, France

September 28, 2022

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Here are the ten best pet-friendly hotels in Paris, France. Be sure to contact our Travel Specialists for the most up-to-date information and specific pet-friendly policies at each hotel.

Brach Paris

Tablet’s been online long enough to see several evolutions of Philippe Starck’s hospitality-design career, and with Brach Paris we find him in yet another mood — this hotel, in Paris’s 16th, makes an unlikely sort of glamour from the materials of the 1970s, to suit the building’s vintage. This means glossy wood paneling, leather, metal, vibrant patterns in earthy colors, and mirrors more or less everywhere. Rooms, as you’d expect from Starck, are full of unexpected visual details, but their thoroughgoing luxury — marble basins, soaking tubs, automated blackout shades — make them feel eclectic rather than prankish. And the suites are particularly lavish, featuring terraces with 180° views of Paris, some of them facing the Eiffel Tower. In Starck’s hands whimsy and high luxury go hand in hand, which makes for a memorable stay, to say the very least.

Brach Paris
Brach Paris

The building, a former postal sorting facility, has a surplus of underground space, which Brach Paris has filled with health and wellness spaces, including exercise machines, a 23-meter pool, a massive hot tub, and classes like boxing and “Abdo Express.” And on certain nights the Sports Club turns into a nightclub, where world-class DJs play to an audience of in-the-know Parisians and hotel guests.On the ground floor you’ll find Restaurant Brach, an open-kitchen small-plates Mediterranean restaurant with communal seating. A pastry shop and a barber shop round out the public spaces, and there’s also a rooftop, with a small lounge for events and a functioning kitchen garden, growing ingredients — and raising chickens — for the restaurant. How many hotels in Paris can say the same?

Hotel Grand Powers

As you’d expect from a combination of the Roaring Twenties and the Golden Triangle, the Grand Powers is luxe indeed, its thoroughly re-imagined interiors living up to the Haussmannian grandeur of the building’s façade. There’s a touch of Art Deco, a bit of British and Italian influence, and more than a dash of contemporary design, but overall the impression is as classic as it gets — some rooms have balconies, and some have views of the Eiffel Tower.

Hotel Grand Powers
Hotel Grand Powers

Not only are the rooms and suites luxurious, but the Grand Powers offers some high-end facilities and services: the spa comes complete with massage, hammam, a sauna, and a Jacuzzi, as well as a fitness center, and Café 52, the restaurant, is open for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. And lest we forget, its Golden Triangle location — on the Rue François 1er, which bisects the triangle — means you’re right at the heart of one of the world’s great shopping districts.

Sinner Paris

One of the most storied Parisian neighborhoods, Le Marais is known for its aristocratic distant past, its rather more debaucherous recent history, and its current status as one of the city’s most artistic and creative districts. Hoteliers EVOK, the group responsible for Tablet favorites Brach and Nolinski, have taken inspiration from the most colorful aspects of the Marais, and the proof is in the name: Sinner evokes both the ecclesiastical orders who first established this district and the contemporary pleasure-seekers who visit it today.

Sinner Paris
Sinner Paris

Designer and architect Tristan Auer was given free rein to create a truly immersive experience, one marked by dramatic public spaces, opulent guest quarters, and a dash of the carefree optimism of the Seventies. The result is colorful, eclectic, and though tightly composed, far from minimal — less “urban zen” than invigorating sensory overload. It’s vibrant and incredibly dramatic, but elegant all the same, and as plush as can be, in keeping with its hedonistic mission.

Le Burgundy Paris

It’s rare in any city, and especially in Paris, that a new hotel immediately becomes an instant classic. In the case of Le Burgundy, however, it’s not at all out of the question. Though more modest in size than some of the big-name grand hotels — the Burgundy is just 59 rooms — it’s scarcely any less luxurious, and its location is ideal for both cultural and commercial purposes, close by not only to many of the major sights but to some of the planet’s finest high-end shopping as well.

Le Burgundy Paris
Le Burgundy Paris

So the in-room life is appropriately luxe. Le Burgundy is pushed to the top of the heap by a couple of notable inclusions. There’s a health club, complete with indoor pool, and the Spa Le Burgundy by Sothys is the equal of any in Paris. And along with an English-style cocktail bar named after Baudelaire, there’s a Michelin-starred restaurant, also called Le Baudelaire, supervised by executive chef Guillaume Goupil and pastry chef Pascal Hainigue.

Marquis Faubourg Saint-Honoré

It wasn’t all that long ago that we found ourselves continually using these pages to call for a modern boutique-style revolution in the Parisian hotel scene. Well, we certainly aren’t about to claim the credit, but the revolution, it’s safe to say, has taken place. Paris is full of design statements of all shapes and sizes — but few, it must be said, feel quite as tailor-made, quite so subtly adapted to their historical surroundings, as the Marquis Faubourg Saint-Honoré.

Marquis Faubourg Saint-Honoré
Marquis Faubourg Saint-Honoré

They’re all suites, as you’d expect — there’s no such thing as a twin room in a proper mansion. Interiors are warm and elegant, spaces ample, and the bathrooms are Carrara marble, proof that sometimes the old ways are the best ways. There’s a private gym and an arrangement with a neighboring spa for in-room treatments, and the private lounge, Le Gilbert, serves breakfast in the morning and drinks and light meals all day and evening. A big-splash palace hotel it’s not, and neither is it an eccentric, aggressively avant-garde design hotel. Instead the Marquis is, above all else, discreet — what goes on within its walls tends to stay there.

Relais Christine

A 13th-century abbey converted into a small and charmingly traditional boutique hotel would be special enough, were it located somewhere far out in the French countryside; in the heart of Paris’s Latin Quarter, however, it’s truly extraordinary. This is the Relais Christine, hidden away in a quiet cobbled courtyard in Saint-Germain-des-Prés, close by to the Louvre and Notre Dame, and a short walk from the banks of the Seine.

Relais Christine
Relais Christine

The 48 rooms vary in size, all individually decorated, but all decked out in the rich colors and lush fabrics and upholstery that you come to Paris for in the first place. Beamed ceilings and all manner of period architectural detail keep the eye interested, and unlike some over-ornate classic Parisian interiors, the Relais Christine’s rooms never feel overstuffed. Views overlook gardens, courtyards or a quiet private street, and some of the suites come with private garden terraces. Downstairs is the impressive new Spa Guerlain, complete with a Finnish sauna, a lovely mosaic jacuzzi, and a well-equipped fitness center. And while there’s no restaurant, the St. Germain district isn’t hurting for options, including the legendary Les Deux Magots.

L’Hôtel

No two rooms are the same — any hotel with even a modicum of personality is likely to include such a phrase somewhere in its promotional literature, and it is bound to be true, at least to some degree, of any hotel selected by Tablet (though there may be a Japanese capsule hotel in our future). Then again, no two snowflakes are the same either, and that's not exactly a compelling argument for sleeping in the snow, is it? That said, in L’Hôtel's case, it really is true. The rooms really are all different, vastly different, so different they seem to belong to separate hotels, or even continents. The Barroco is in Italian Baroque style, the Pagode in an antique Japanese theme, the Léopard is finished in leopard-print fabrics, and the Oscar Wilde is in a traditional English style, a partial reconstruction of Wilde's dining room in London, featuring framed letters from the staff urging him to settle his hotel bill (which he did not live to do). All of this is carried off with a charm and a mastery that elevates it above gimmickry, into the category of real character, of personality.

L’Hôtel
L’Hôtel

Personality, after all, is what makes a hotel a Tablet hotel — not 24-hour room service, or indoor pools, or other standard five-star amenities. What cookie-cutter chain hotel can match L'Hôtel's central spiral staircase, into which sunlight pours through a domed glass ceiling, or the Roman-style bath, housed in the vault beneath the hotel? There is a restaurant, and a good one — not a three-star spectacle of a restaurant, but an excellent one anyway. Le Restaurant exists not as a public relations scheme, or as a way for the hotel to maximize food and beverage profits, but as a service to its patrons — remarkable food, French but totally modern and light. This restaurant is as popular with the locals as the bar is with celebrities.

The Hôtel du Petit Moulin

The Hôtel du Petit Moulin may take some determination to find — the sign on this listed 17th-century building still reads “Boulangerie” — but those who persevere are in for a treat. Hidden behind this century-old facade is a vibrant and contemporary environment designed from top to bottom by the fashion designer Christian Lacroix, an environment that is remarkable for the fact that it’s equally opposed both to the 19th-century antique look on display in most Parisian hotels and to the minimalist style that’s the default option for modern boutique hotels the world over.

The Hôtel du Petit Moulin
The Hôtel du Petit Moulin

The public spaces set the scene for something a little bit different, mixing and matching elegant historic touches with colorful and surprising modern elements. But it’s in the guest rooms that the Hôtel du Petit Moulin really takes off. Each is completely different, the heaping white beds the only common element — wallpapers vary from vivid floral prints or bold stripes to hand-drawn designs and realistic scenes, while furnishings are upholstered in anything from velvet to leather to fur. Flat-screen televisions and wireless internet are standard, and the bathrooms feature deep modern soaking tubs and Codage bath products. The hotel’s kitchen serves only breakfast, but this is hardly a drawback; the surrounding Marais district is home to a wealth of cafés, bistros and restaurants, and some of the nearest ones go so far as to deliver via room service.

Hôtel de Crillon

It’s not much of an exaggeration to say that the Hôtel de Crillon is Paris — from its privileged position on the Place de la Concorde, the backdrop to so many of this city’s defining events, to its century-long tenure as the ultimate Parisian luxury hotel, it’s never been one to fly under the radar. And now, fresh off a massive renovation, it’s ready for the spotlight once more, under new management; it’s now officially the Hôtel de Crillon, A Rosewood Hotel.

Hôtel de Crillon
Hôtel de Crillon

Any worry about a takeover by an established hotel brand is quite misplaced in this case. Rosewood knows a thing or two about preserving the essential character of historic hotel properties, and the Crillon hasn’t lost one iota of old-fashioned opulence in the course of its rebirth. An all-star team of French architects, creative directors, and interior designers oversaw the historically sensitive project, and even the new Karl Lagerfeld–designed suites are true to the 18th-century character of the Crillon — no surprise, as Lagerfeld himself is something of an expert in the visual language of the era.

Hôtel de Nell

This is how hotel minimalism is supposed to be done — instead of feeling stripped to the studs, Hôtel de Nell is imbued with a tranquil, understated warmth, and a depth of texture that's so often lost at other pared-down hotels. As ever, it's all in the details: the heated parquet floors topped with easy-on-the-toes organic wool carpets, black stone-walled showers you'll never want to get out of, and, in the better rooms, massive Japanese bathtubs carved from single blocks of raw marble and fitted with Oregon myrtlewood accessories. Though the location on Rue du Conservatoire in the 9th Arrondissement may not have enormous name recognition, the streetscape is nonetheless postcard-worthy. Across a narrow lane from the hotel is the 19th-century Sainte-Cécile church on one corner and a classic Haussmann-style building on the other. Most rooms have views of one or the other framed by the picture windows, and whatever the view, there’s plenty of natural light.

Hôtel de Nell
Hôtel de Nell

If it’s the tiniest bit out of the way (and really only the tiniest bit), the hotel more than makes up for it with a destination-worthy restaurant and bar. The former is a “bistronomy” concept by the highly acclaimed chef Yoni Saada, a happy inversion of the usual Parisian boutique hotel norm of forcing guests outside the doors to find something to eat; here, one of the city’s finest chefs comes to you. Though the staff will gladly point you toward a typically atmospheric Parisian café when the mood strikes, you could just as easily spend the morning with a newspaper and coffee in the hotel’s elegant library, or an afternoon sipping cocktails in its glass-roofed bar. There’s even a small, very tranquil spa, a rarity among Parisian hotels of this size.

There are no shortage of pet-friendly hotels in Paris, France. Here is every pet-friendly hotel in Paris:

Relais Christine
Hôtel Montalembert
L’Hôtel
Bulgari Hotel Milano
Hôtel de Crillon, A Rosewood Hotel
Four Seasons George V
Sofitel Paris Le Faubourg
Hôtel de Sers
Hôtel du Petit Moulin
Magna Pars L'Hotel À Parfum
Hôtel Keppler
Castille Paris - Starhotels Collezione
Le Burgundy Paris
Le Royal Monceau - Raffles Paris
Shangri-La Hotel, Paris
Hyatt Paris Madeleine
Marquis Faubourg Saint-Honoré
Hotel Marignan Champs-Elysées
Hôtel de Nell
La Clef Louvre
Hôtel Vernet
Les Dames Du Panthéon
La Réserve Paris Hotel and Spa
Nolinski Paris
The Hoxton, Paris
Hôtel Grand Powers
Brach Paris
J.K. Place Paris
Le Damantin Hotel & Spa
Sinner Paris
Cour des Vosges
Hôtel Pas de Calais

Popular Questions

If you have any questions about the rules and regulations about bringing your pet to a pet-friendly hotel, you can always contact our Travel Specialists for specific information. Below are a few frequently asked questions.

What kind of pets are allowed at a pet-friendly hotel?

Usually a pet-friendly policy applies to dogs and cats, but sometimes only one or the other is allowed — and sometimes other types of pets (birds, lizards, unicorns), are allowed as well. Please note that certain hotels may also have a weight restriction for pets.

Will there be a fee?

When we say pet-friendly, we mean a policy that allows pets -- but often there is a nightly or flat fee (sometimes called a "cleaning fee") as part of the policy.

Can I leave my pet alone in the room?

Certain hotels specify that you may not leave your pet unattended. However, some offer daycare or dog-walking services.

Can I bring my pet into public spaces (like restaurants or bars?)

Oftentimes, a pet-friendly policy will allow your pet outdoors at the hotel but not in public areas. You can always bring them a doggy bag.

Will the hotel have amenities for my pet?

Especially pet-friendly hotels provide pet amenities like food and water bowls, special beds, or treats. Be sure to contact our Travel Specialists for the most up-to-date information and specific pet-friendly policies at each hotel.