Pet-Friendly Boutique Hotels in
London, England

September 19, 2022

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Here are the ten best pet-friendly hotels in London, England. Be sure to contact our Travel Specialists for the most up-to-date information and specific pet-friendly policies at each hotel.

South Place Hotel

South Place Hotel offers a pitch-perfect lesson in some of the most exciting changes taking place in London — from its eastward-moving hotel scene to its most forward-thinking designers to its up-and-coming visual artists — but instead of some didactic bore, your instructor is a witty, über-savvy hotelier eager to show you a fantastic time. Of course if your hotel search has led you this far east on the map, you likely already know that the City of London and its surroundings are no longer just where Londoners work — home to one of the world’s great financial centers — but increasingly where they drink and dance and dine, far from the heavily trafficked circus of Piccadilly. And with a rooftop bar that was a coveted nightlife destination practically before it opened (LCD Soundsystem’s Nancy Whang dropped in for one of the initial DJ sessions alongside the house act), South Place knows how to play.

South Place Hotel
South Place Hotel

Fortunately, it’s as easy to get a good night’s sleep here as it is to get an expertly crafted drink. The rooms are designed by Conran, who also did the celebrated new Boundary Hotel nearby, and it’s clear who had the power in the relationship between the accountants and the designers. Rooms run from spacious-by-London-standards to positively enormous, with beds, which start out king-size and only get bigger, to match. Lavish Italian-marble bathrooms are stocked with toiletries by the perfumer James Heeley; oversized showers fit two or three bathers at a time; massive Bang & Olufsen screens come with free on-demand movies; and luxurious bedding, including mattresses wrapped in cashmere and silver (why not?), are by Josephine Home. Not that it’s all extravagance for the sake of extravagance. Take the highly functional, oversized work-desks, fitted with recessed media hubs and multinational sockets — perhaps less sexy than, say, the glass bathtub in the window of the Suite 610 room, but proof that function can coexist with form.

Home House London

Home House lies on Portman Square, just off of Oxford Street, around the corner from Selfridge’s and mere streets from Hyde Park. It’s essentially hiding in plain sight, a discreet trio of Georgian townhouses, and you’ll immediately notice the old-world approach to service — private club staff are exceedingly capable and accommodating without being chirpy or solicitous.

Home House London
Home House London

The style remains true, for the most part, to the club’s Georgian-era roots, with some dramatically contemporary exceptions: the reception and bar feature furnishings by Zaha Hadid which look like something beamed in from some advanced interstellar civilization. The rooms, meanwhile, are as classic as they come, every one different in layout and décor, with modern comforts to complement their 18th-century style. Perhaps more important than the accommodations are the club’s (semi-)public spaces, which include a pair of restaurants as well as no fewer than three bars and a handful of lounges and drawing rooms as well. It’s here that you’ll mingle — discreetly, of course — with not only hotel guests but club members as well. That, more than the location, the amenities, or the style of the rooms, is the key to the appeal of a place like Home House.

The Standard London

Brutalist architecture is back in a big way — good news for London, which is practically swimming in the stuff. The old Seventies-era Camden Town Hall Annexe, just opposite St Pancras Station in King’s Cross, has lived long enough to evolve from an architectural pariah into something precious. After a number of developers came close to demolishing it, in swooped the Standard hotel group, who rightly saw a bit of their own aesthetic reflected in its orderly Modernist geometry. The Standard, London is the brand’s first outside of America, and it’s a perfect fit for this newly hip North London neighborhood.

The Standard London
The Standard London

The colorful interiors provide maximum contrast with the monochrome façade, and they’re notable for their period inspiration, if not their historical correctness — with their space-age lines and their saturated secondary colors they’re an homage to the utopian currents of Seventies modernism. The rooms are instantly memorable, recalling a familiar era but avoiding all the mid-century clichés. And at the high end you’ll find unexpected luxuries, like private terraces with outdoor bathtubs. Soon to open are chef Adam Rawson’s restaurant and bar: Isla and Double Standard. Both promise, if the Standard brand’s previous history is any guide, to be well-loved by travelers and to become fixtures on the local scene as well.

The Mayfair Townhouse London

The name is actually a charming bit of understatement — the Mayfair Townhouse is not one Georgian townhouse, but an entire row of them, fifteen in all, on the eye-wateringly posh Half Moon Street, adjacent to Green Park. And while certain other parts of Mayfair are far too rich to have a discernible personality, this hotel is up to its neck in colorful, memorable character, making much of its Oscar Wilde associations and packed with whimsical art and design objects, many featuring the fox motif that’s the hotel’s graphic mascot.

The Mayfair Townhouse London
The Mayfair Townhouse London

Rooms and suites are a romantic blend of period details and contemporary design, full of rich, saturated colors and vibrant graphic patterns. There’s more than a touch of country-house atmosphere, and the tangible luxuries are formidable, from high-end mattresses to custom bath products. They start out lavish enough, and by the time you’re in the suites, you’re experiencing comforts far beyond the reach of most boutique hotels. Further underscoring the Mayfair Townhouse’s playful flamboyance is the Dandy Bar, a club-style bar with an impressively idiosyncratic wine list and a cocktail menu to match. And while there isn’t a restaurant in the traditional sense, breakfast is served in the Club Room, and the Dandy Bar has its own all-day menu.

Town Hall Hotel

Located in Bethnal Green, Town Hall Hotel lies a short distance eastward of London’s traditional hospitality centers — a slight remove which, depending on your feelings about the touristic thrum of London’s traditional hospitality centers, may very well count as a merit. Bethnal Green these days, of course, has plenty to recommend it, and one shudders at the thought of what a night at Town Hall might cost were it located in the West End. A fifteen-minute Tube ride from central London is the non-pecuniary price you pay for rooms that are spacious, apartments that are downright sprawling, and services — not just a spa but an indoor pool as well — that would set you back thousands at the center of the city.

Town Hall Hotel
Town Hall Hotel

The interiors are spacious enough that the Town Hall is free to embrace a certain spare and minimal contemporary style, the sort of thing that could come off a bit like a space capsule if these rooms weren’t so generously sized. At this size (and inside this historic neoclassical building) the effect is stylish rather than stark. And while Bethnal Green is somewhat peripheral, it’s certainly no suburb — there’s no shortage of city culture here, including more than a few fine restaurants. One of them, the intimate Corner Room, happens to be on premises, along with the stylish, cocktail-centric Peg + Patriot bar. If it’s your first time in London, or if you’re here for the museums and theatre, then perhaps this location isn’t your very first choice — but with a little local knowledge, or just the confidence to explore, Town Hall becomes a very viable option.

Middle Eight

Named for the section of a song where new, contrasting material is traditionally introduced, Middle Eight aims to do something similar for Covent Garden: adding something vibrant and memorable to the neighborhood that’s nevertheless recognizably a part of its surroundings. The immediate setting, Great Queen Street, lies just beyond the end of Long Acre, Covent Garden’s main drag, and places the hotel within walking distance of no end of shops, restaurants, bars, and theatres.

Middle Eight
Middle Eight

Which makes it only natural that Middle Eight should offer its own variation on Covent Garden’s highly sociable spaces. Sycamore is an all-day restaurant and bar with an Italian-inspired menu, set in a wide-open room that’s always lively with comings and goings, attached to the Balcony, a cocktail bar that doubles as a venue for afternoon tea. And for a modulation into a more intimate key, there’s QT, a speakeasy-style basement bar featuring live music and comedy shows on the site of the historic Kingsway Hall. More intimate still are the rooms and suites. Here classic London glamour meets modern materials and comforts; the straightforwardly named Cosy Pad is just enough for a pied-à-terre, while at the other end of the range, the Middle Eight’s suites offer extravagances like freestanding bathtubs, separate living or dining rooms, and even petrified walls or water features. Like any good middle eight it’s unexpected, but feels somehow inevitable all the same.

L’oscar London

If you’re the literary type, you might be won over by the prospect of a hotel inspired by Oscar Wilde — and if interior design is your medium, you may be more thrilled at the prospect of Jacques Garcia’s first London hotel. L’oscar London certainly begins with promising material, in a landmark Baroque-style Baptist church just yards from Holborn station. But it’s what they’ve done with the place that really impresses; this is a vision of London that Wilde surely would have preferred to the Victorian one in which he lived.

L’oscar London
L’oscar London

For both Wilde and Garcia are known for decadence, in different ways, and L’oscar is nothing if not decadent. The rooms and suites are decorated in hyper-saturated jewel tones, with plenty of Art Deco elegance and a pervasive birds-and-butterflies motif. It’d be among the most romantic hotels in Paris; in London it’s practically without equal. The building’s original purpose has furnished the name for the Baptist Bar, where cocktails named for Biblical references are served alongside live music. L’oscar Restaurant, on the other hand, takes its inspiration from Paris by way of an homage to Venetian architecture, serving classic bistro fare in a darkly opulent dining room.

Great Scotland Yard London

This is a building whose fame, paradoxically, ends up obscuring it — “Scotland Yard” now refers to wherever the Metropolitan Police headquarters is, and the name followed the agency when it moved, over a century ago, into new digs closer to Westminster. Now Great Scotland Yard, the original Edwardian brick edifice, is back in circulation, this time as a luxury hotel in Hyatt’s Unbound Collection.

Great Scotland Yard London
Great Scotland Yard London

In this new guise it’s jam-packed with history — though its interiors have been completely rebuilt, they’re an homage to the building’s 19th-century grandeur, and the décor leans heavily on artworks and memorabilia recalling its glory years. The rooms and suites are more contemporary in style than the public spaces, though still grounded in tradition, and they’re full of the latest luxury-hotel comforts.

Nobu Hotel London

This corner of Marylebone has grown increasingly hip in recent years, and the opening of the Nobu Hotel London Portland Square feels like an exclamation mark. And while the crowd and the vibe will necessarily differ in certain ways from the first Nobu hotel, in the arty East London district of Shoreditch, the experience is a no less memorable one: inspired interiors, lavish luxury, and a very fine restaurant, all under one roof.

Nobu Hotel London
Nobu Hotel London

The building itself was formerly a less distinguished business hotel, but fear not; once you’re over the threshold, you’re immersed in an ultra-stylish, ultra-luxe version of London with a pronounced Japanese accent, thanks to designer David Collins, who’s responsible for the hotel’s public spaces. The rooms, by Make Architects, are no less impressive, though they are rather more sedate — here Nobu’s heritage lends a minimalistic, Zen-derived tranquility, as well as some quintessentially Japanese amenities like Toto washlets and oversized soaking tubs.

The Stratford Hotel London

Named not for any Shakespearean connection but for its up-and-coming neighborhood in far East London, the Stratford occupies an ultra-modern tower adjacent to the Stratford International rail station. And it’s inspired not by Elizabethan England but by present-day New York, with loft-style rooms and modernist-inspired furniture and décor; the penthouse is in fact called the Manhattan Studio. There’s a fitness center with an impressive selection of classes, and a handful of restaurants and bars, including the much-in-demand Allegra, whose creators and designers are veterans of establishments like Noma and Chiltern Firehouse.

The Stratford Hotel London
The Stratford Hotel London

We’ve been talking up East London for a long time now, but this is still a couple of stops beyond Hackney and Bethnal Green, on the far side of Olympic Park. At the moment the Stratford is something of an attraction unto itself; with design by Space Copenhagen, it’s the most stylish thing for miles, and both Allegra and the Brasserie are worth the trip. Best of all might be the extra space and sunlight afforded to the rooms and studios; the largest, the Manhattan Studio, spans some 65 square meters and feels more like a penthouse apartment than an ordinary hotel room.

There are no shortage of pet-friendly hotels in London, England. Here is every pet-friendly hotel in London:

The Hoxton, Shoreditch
Town Hall Hotel
The Hari London
South Place Hotel
ME London
The Hoxton, Holborn
Chiltern Firehouse
Home House London
The Ned
Nobu Hotel Shoreditch
L'oscar London
The Hoxton, Southwark
The Standard London
Great Scotland Yard London
Middle Eight
Nobu Hotel London Portman Square
The Mayfair Townhouse London
The Stratford Hotel London
Chateau Denmark

Popular Questions

If you have any questions about the rules and regulations about bringing your pet to a pet-friendly hotel, you can always contact our Travel Specialists for specific information. Below are a few frequently asked questions.

What kind of pets are allowed at a pet-friendly hotel?

Usually a pet-friendly policy applies to dogs and cats, but sometimes only one or the other is allowed — and sometimes other types of pets (birds, lizards, unicorns), are allowed as well. Please note that certain hotels may also have a weight restriction for pets.

Will there be a fee?

When we say pet-friendly, we mean a policy that allows pets -- but often there is a nightly or flat fee (sometimes called a "cleaning fee") as part of the policy.

Can I leave my pet alone in the room?

Certain hotels specify that you may not leave your pet unattended. However, some offer daycare or dog-walking services.

Can I bring my pet into public spaces (like restaurants or bars?)

Oftentimes, a pet-friendly policy will allow your pet outdoors at the hotel but not in public areas. You can always bring them a doggy bag.

Will the hotel have amenities for my pet?

Especially pet-friendly hotels provide pet amenities like food and water bowls, special beds, or treats. Be sure to contact our Travel Specialists for the most up-to-date information and specific pet-friendly policies at each hotel.