Pet-Friendly Boutique Hotels in
Rome, Italy

September 19, 2022

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Here are the ten best pet-friendly hotels in Rome, Italy. Be sure to contact our Travel Specialists for the most up-to-date information and specific pet-friendly policies at each hotel.

JK Place Roma

Michele Bönan’s designs may be some of the most recognizable in the business, but they’re always tailored to the location — here they’re stunning as always, a little more sober than the nautically inspired JK Capri, and a bit more vibrant than the very restrained Florence edition. With just thirty rooms and suites it’s definitely boutique-scaled, though within the rooms you’ll find comforts to rival the better luxury hotels — this means top-end materials and furnishings to back up the visual punch, and bathrooms that are worth writing home about.

JK Place Roma
JK Place Roma

The location, near the Spanish Steps, makes JK Place’s ultra-discreet service and posh boutique seclusion even more important. What it lacks, in comparison with the typical five-stars, is a comprehensive list of facilities — but many of us would happily miss out on a gym and spa if what we get in return is a stylish rooftop terrace bar and lounge, the perfect place from which to contemplate the prospect of a more permanent Roman holiday.

Crossing Condotti

Hoteliers in Rome seem to feel the pressure of thousands of years of civilization — most hotels strive to be as monumental as the city they serve. A place like Crossing Condotti, by contrast, shows there’s wisdom in keeping things relatively understated. It’s not your typical hotel, but these nine swanky accommodations in a townhouse just off the Spanish Steps are probably truer to the notion of contemporary Roman luxury than any number of marbled, colonnaded grand hotels. Instead it’s a glamorous little pied-à-terre with five contemporary rooms and a single junior suite, all with generous touches like L’Occitane bath products in the bathrooms; the master room and junior site come with their own LED-lit chromatherapy hamam for a singularly relaxing experience. Paintings and antique furniture from the owners’ private collection add an unusually sophisticated touch of homeyness.

Crossing Condotti
Crossing Condotti

Given Crossing Condotti’s scale, the interiors matter perhaps more here than in the average hotel. There’s neither room service nor a restaurant. What you have is something closer to that old travel cliché, a home away from home, where instead of going to the business center you simply ask the staff if you can borrow a laptop, and they gladly oblige. That said, the amenities are resolutely with the times — several rooms offer an iPad, and every room includes complimentary wi-fi. A private kitchenette, available in select rooms, includes Nespresso machines and a refrigerator with free soft drinks. All rooms come with complimentary hot drinks and a selection of snacks — all you need before you hit the streets. This is more or less at the center of all things retail in Rome, and you’re surrounded by more restaurants, bars and historical and cultural sites than you could care to name. Forget the grand old echoing lobbies full of marble. After a long day scrambling around Rome, what you’ll want is a relaxing bath and some high-end linens to wrap yourself in — and of course that’s exactly what you’ve got at Crossing Condotti.

Palazzo Scanderbeg

“Palazzo” means “palace,” but this is an urban version of one, more like a townhouse, the opulent Renaissance-style parlors and suites shaped into apartments and suites that are surprisingly spacious for such a central location. Some of the original features remain, while others have been brought in — note the floors, laid with reclaimed wood from Venice. But overall, the interior has more of a contemporary aesthetic and atmosphere. Suites feature some of the palazzo’s grand architectural details, like high ceilings with exposed wooden beams and molding. But the decor is clean and modern, and the amenities thoroughly practical: flat-screen TVs in every living room and bedroom, free wi-fi, coffee machines. Many suites have kitchens, a welcome extra, even if you’re not likely to do much more than make toast for breakfast or stir a few aperitivi to sip before dinner.

Palazzo Scanderbeg
Palazzo Scanderbeg

You’re in the heart of Rome, after all, with all that implies. And while the extra square footage is certainly wonderful — as is the terrace, hammam-style shower, and part-time butler service you’d get with some of the upper-level suites — a hotel room in this city, more than most, is essentially a place to take a break between sightseeing and shopping, wining and dining. Thanks to the hotel’s prime location, you could even drop in after one of those three-course lunches for a blissful nap. Palazzo Scanderbeg’s not a detour: it’s on the way to everything.

Hotel Lord Byron

It’s readily apparent from the name that the Hotel Lord Byron is nobody’s idea of a stereotypical Roman hotel. And though there’s nothing wrong with Rome’s central grand hotels, there’s something to be said for a smaller and more intimate hotel, just off the Borghese Gardens in the upscale Parioli district. Once a private villa in the Liberty style, an Italian variant of Art Nouveau, the Lord Byron has been renovated to take on a lush Art Deco look, a blend of modern and antique that feels effortlessly stylish, especially compared to the aging palace hotels and the ultra-modern design experiments elsewhere in town.

Hotel Lord Byron
Hotel Lord Byron

The location may be the Lord Byron’s greatest advantage: though it’s a taxi ride from most city destinations, many find it’s worth the small trouble, both for the near absence of sightseers and for the commanding hilltop location, with its spectacular city and garden views. Most rooms come with balconies or terraces, as well as marble baths, fabric-covered walls and massive, enveloping beds. If you’re up for a stroll, Piazza del Popolo is just fifteen minutes away on foot, and major sights like the Spanish Steps are easily within range of one of the hotel’s free loaner bikes.

Leon’s Place

Contemporary design is now so common in hotels as to have become almost standard. But there are still some places where a bit of modernity goes a long way, places where there’s a striking contrast between the clean and contemporary interiors and the ancient character of the weathered streets outside. Rome is one of these places — and Leon’s Place is a fine example of the way one’s perspective on an ancient city can be changed by the view from a modern hotel.

Leon’s Place
Leon’s Place

The Planetaria Hotels group is making a name for itself with hotels like this one, applying an interior style that mixes Art Deco and other early 20th-century influences with a healthy dose of contemporary chic, all under the roof of a historic old building. Here the result is difficult to date, and feels somewhat timeless, lending an air of fantasy to the proceedings. It’s not quite a top-end luxury hotel, but it’s far from uncomfortable — space is relatively plentiful, especially in the junior suites, and the offerings include a bar and lounge, a wellness center complete with spa, and more conference space than most of us will need. And from here it doesn’t take long to get to the iconic sights of contemporary Rome — the location, on the Via XX Settembre, is close to the Trevi Fountain and the Spanish Steps.

Nerva Boutique Hotel

It’s named for the emperor who built the last of Rome’s fora, and in fact it stands just outside the walls of the Forum of Nerva, a few streets up from the Colosseum. But don’t go expecting an Imperial Roman experience from the Nerva Boutique Hotel. It’s housed in an antique building — of recent vintage compared to the Forum, mind — but inside it’s coolly contemporary in that effortless Roman way, confidently indifferent to the antiqities that lie outside its walls.

Nerva Boutique Hotel
Nerva Boutique Hotel

The rooms are vibrant and stylish, full of modern Italian furnishings, and despite their modest square footage, they’re smart and comfortable. And if space is a concern, the suites are up to the task — one comes with its own courtyard, and the other is a split-level space that sleeps up to four. There’s no restaurant — Nerva is more guest-house than grand hotel — but this being Rome, you’re never far from a mind-blowing meal. Monti, the neighborhood, is full of fine little restaurants and independent shops, and when it comes time for sightseeing, you’re within walking distance of the Trevi Fountain, the Spanish Steps, and the Pantheon, and connected to the rest of Rome via the Colosseum metro station.

Hotel dei Barbieri

For the daily contrast of modern urban living and millennia-old historical sites, not many places can compete with Rome. Hotel dei Barbieri, though tucked away down a quiet side street, is among the best-located Roman boutique hotels — not only is it close to the Pantheon and the Campo de’ Fiori, but it’s mere yards from the Largo di Torre Argentina, the site of some recently unearthed ruins, including the spot where Caesar is believed to have met his end.

Hotel dei Barbieri
Hotel dei Barbieri

Of course you’re also surrounded by restaurants, wine bars, gourmet food shops, boutiques, and all the other accoutrements of city-center living. As for the hotel itself, it’s a stunning update of a 17th-century building, and its interiors mix lovingly preserved period architecture with cutting-edge contemporary design — another signature of modern Italian luxury-boutique hospitality. The hotel’s own restaurant, bar, and café are worthy additions to the neighborhood, serving exquisite local fare in an intimate and dramatic space. And while it’s more than a mere pied-à-terre, you’ll likely be spending quite a bit of time on your feet in the surrounding city — Trastevere, just across the river to the south, is home to more than its fair share of fine restaurants, and to the southeast lie the Forum and the Colosseum.

The Hoxton, Rome

The location — in Salario, to the east of the Villa Borghese — is just central enough to provide easy access to all the essential attractions, and just peripheral enough to feel like an authentic slice of contemporary Roman life. It also affords space for nearly 200 rooms, ranging from “Shoebox” to “Biggy,” all decorated in a fresh-yet-familiar style that pays generous tribute to mid-century Italian modernism.

The Hoxton, Rome
The Hoxton, Rome

Cugino, the restaurant, is a partnership with Marigold, a beloved local restaurant and bakery, and serves breakfast, brunch, and lunch — and then, at six in the evening, transforms into an aperitivi bar and then a late-night cocktail spot, serving a light all-day menu. A second restaurant featuring proper dinner service is coming soon, but until then you’ll easily make do with a fine selection of neighborhood eateries.

The Inn at the Roman Forum

Something of a sequel to the Inn at the Spanish Steps, the Inn at the Roman Forum takes a very similar approach. This one, like the other, is a charming and luxe retreat with a personality all its own — this one tucked away down a very minor alleyway, but like the other, right next to one of Rome’s famous tourist attractions.

The Inn at the Roman Forum
The Inn at the Roman Forum

Which is why it’s remarkable just how quiet and private this place is. The fourteen rooms are all different, all plush and comfortable, the interiors livelier than the usual design-hotel fare — many come with whirlpool baths and all come with plasma televisions, DVD players, iPod stereo systems and a full complement of Etro bath products. Some of the rooms and suites open onto outdoor terraces, and there’s a garden terrace out back and a living room upstairs — but the greatest surprise, by far, has to be the crypt. That’s right, the crypt; underneath this centuries-old building is a millennia-old Roman crypt, accessible via a little doorway behind the reception. That’s one amenity the average boutique hotel can’t match, though it’d be entertaining to see them try. Back in the land of the living, there’s yet another terrace on the roof, perfect for a sunset cocktail or two — one advantage of the location, next to the Forum and a stone’s throw from the Colosseum, is that travelers find themselves well taken care of.

Portrait Roma

The flagship Ferragamo store at the foot of the Spanish Steps would already be something of a holy place, if you’re into that sort of thing. Less well known, but possibly more exciting, is what’s upstairs, in the top floors of this 19th-century townhouse: the Portrait Roma, the newest in a string of chic city boutique hotels by Lungarno, the Ferragamo family’s hospitality concern.

Portrait Roma
Portrait Roma

As you’d expect from that kind of pedigree, the Portrait Roma have style to spare. The designer is the same Michele Bonan who’s responsible for the rest of the Lungarno Collection hotels, and he’s in fine form here, turning out interiors that are elegant, understated, and above all richer than rich, from the silk curtains to the elevator, lined not just in leather but in ultra-luxe boarskin leather. Simpler pleasures abound as well — many rooms come with petite balconies overlooking the action on the streets below, and the hotel’s finest detail has to be the rooftop lounge, serving cocktails by the fireplace with a view of the Spanish Steps. You can’t stay on this world-famous shopper’s boulevard without being prepared to drop some cash, but if money is truly no object then try the penthouse, with its own kitchen, sauna, and private terrace — there’s possibly no more princely lodging in all of Rome.

There are no shortage of pet-friendly hotels in Rome, Italy. Here is every pet-friendly hotel in Rome:

La Posta Vecchia
Hotel Lord Byron
Inn at the Spanish Steps
Anantara Palazzo Naiadi
Portrait Roma
Hotel San Anselmo
The Inn at the Roman Forum
Hotel Pulitzer Roma
Crossing Condotti
Leon's Place
JK Place Roma
Residenza Napoleone III
DOM Hotel Roma
Palazzo Dama
Palazzo Scanderbeg
Nerva Boutique Hotel
Hotel dei Barbieri
The Hoxton, Rome

Popular Questions

If you have any questions about the rules and regulations about bringing your pet to a pet-friendly hotel, you can always contact our Travel Specialists for specific information. Below are a few frequently asked questions.

What kind of pets are allowed at a pet-friendly hotel?

Usually a pet-friendly policy applies to dogs and cats, but sometimes only one or the other is allowed — and sometimes other types of pets (birds, lizards, unicorns), are allowed as well. Please note that certain hotels may also have a weight restriction for pets.

Will there be a fee?

When we say pet-friendly, we mean a policy that allows pets -- but often there is a nightly or flat fee (sometimes called a "cleaning fee") as part of the policy.

Can I leave my pet alone in the room?

Certain hotels specify that you may not leave your pet unattended. However, some offer daycare or dog-walking services.

Can I bring my pet into public spaces (like restaurants or bars?)

Oftentimes, a pet-friendly policy will allow your pet outdoors at the hotel but not in public areas. You can always bring them a doggy bag.

Will the hotel have amenities for my pet?

Especially pet-friendly hotels provide pet amenities like food and water bowls, special beds, or treats. Be sure to contact our Travel Specialists for the most up-to-date information and specific pet-friendly policies at each hotel.